Division of Science

Programs

General

External

Session

Contact

Department of Mathematics
The City College of New York
160 Convent Avenue
New York, NY 10031

Phone: (212) 650-5346
Fax: (212) 650-6294
math@ccny.cuny.edu

Welcome!

Due to the COVID-19 crisis, all Mathematics Department operations are being performed remotely, including instruction.

The main department telephone lines at (212) 650-5346,7 are being transferred to a personal phone outside the college and will be answered roughly between 11am and 7pm on Monday and Wednesday, and 9am to 5pm on Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday, when the college is not closed for a holiday or snow.

Preferably, email your concerns and questions to math@ccny.cuny.edu, which is also being monitored.

Staff members and administrators are either forwarding their telephone lines or monitoring their campus voicemail on a regular basis.

The Assistant Chair, Prof. Bak, and the Department Advisors for non-majors, Mr. Park and Mr. Turner, are holding regular online advising hours during which you can contact them in real time. The details can found on our Administration page which can be accessed via the left side bar or you can click here.

Additionally, Mr. Turner, who is also the Artino Lab Director, is available during his aforementioned posted office hours to answer programming questions from students in Math 328, 377, and 412/A1200.

Instructors can be contacted via email or their office hours. You can find a listing of instructors by clicking here or you can click here to view office hours for the Summer 2021 term.

We hope everyone stays safe and healthy, and we look forward to seeing each other in person once again.

Dr. Jesse Douglas

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Jesse Douglas won the Belden Medal in his first year at City College. He then continued to win the Fields Medal in 1936. In 1930, he was honored for solving the problem of Plateau, which was an open problem proposed by Joseph-Louis Lagrange in 1760. Jesse Douglas became a full professor at City College in 1955.

He graduated with honors from City College (1916) and received his Ph.D. from Columbia University (1920).